Smithsonian Adds Games To Its American Art Collection

 

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Video games are finally starting to get the recognition they deserve for being a work of art. The Smithsonian is officially inducting two games into their American Art’s Collection as a way to recognize video games as “crucial to our understanding of the American story.”

Though you may be a bit surprised at the two entries. The Smithsonian has selected “Flower” by thatgamecompany and “Halo 2600” by Ed Fries to be inducted into their program. The latter is a de-make of Halo built and released for the Atari 2600 in 2010, though there’s a Flash version also.

According to Wired, the inclusion follows the museum’s 2012 exhibition of video games

I’m a little in love with the post explaining the two games now included in the permanent collection, and it has nothing to do with the medium being patted on the head by a traditional institution (though that does make me feel warm and loved). Rather, I’m pleased that Flower and Halo 2600 aren’t being included solely for conforming to some traditional notion of ‘arty-ness’ – though they do – but seemingly through an understanding and appreciation of the qualities particular to video games,” said Graham Smith at Rock, Paper, Shotgun.

The exact way the games will be included in the display has not yet been decided though it appears the Smithsonian is considering making them playable. 

Video games have only recently begun to be considered an art form. Over the past few years they have been accepted into various museums and the Smithsonian previously selected “Myst” to be included in their museum.